Why organizations must embrace consumerization of learning?

Why organizations must embrace consumerization of learning?

Learner experience is much more than a buzzword; it heralds a paradigm shift. With learner experience, organizations are not creating a learning plan. They are creating an experience, one that will translate to the single most differentiating factor. Experience embodies a “consumerized” approach that is hyper-personalised and multi-modal. Employees today are demanding the freedom to consume the knowledge when and where they want and how they want to from a wide range of content resources, tailored to their learning needs, style, preferences and interests. The learner as a consumer is now leading L&D.

The conventional model of learning delivery is a “one-size-fits-all” approach where knowledge is shared with a broad range of people in exactly the same way. It often ignores the different learning styles of individuals. Today, organizations are being compelled to take a consumer-focused approach. They are making learning available on demand, listening more attentively to their employees, understanding their needs and creating & curating their corporate learning content that learners find useful, relevant and engaging.

Technology is playing the role of a catalyst in revolutionizing learning. Over the last decade, the Internet, social media, and mobile access have become huge factors in our personal and working lives, changing how we interact with information. Now, with information available to us at the click of a mouse or keypad, we have come to expect immediate answers to recreational and job-related questions. In the world of learning, learners can now “pull” the knowledge they need, when they need it, shifting control from L&D departments to the learner. This has led to the expectation that L&D functions should provide contextualized content that is directly mapped to individual needs leading to a surge in personalized learning. It breaks through age-old practices in the world of learning and development, and shifts the focus to the learner, turning the learner into the axis on which rests all other decisions – What path do organizations take? What method do they adopt? How do they bring the knowledge to the learner? – Everything falls into perspective when an organization adopts a singular approach – user-centeredness. While organizations and often learners blame paucity of time as a primary reason for poor learning habits, the actual culprit very often is content and the methods of delivery.

As those responsible for talent development – encouraging learning and rewarding learner behaviors? Self-directed learning is the purest form of talent development – but what are organizations doing about it? A philosophy where an individual feels responsible for their own development is essential to build an everyday learning culture, rather than an isolated training one. As Dr. Kalam put it: “True learning is not a process of pouring in from without, but a calling forth what is within. It’s a process of nurturing, of allowing, of evoking. It is a process of bringing forth the person one is meant to be…”

Learning initiatives must be intrinsically driven, for ensuring commitment over compliance. It’s just like therapy – you can’t really change, unless you know there is a problem and want to. Self-driven learning is a natural corollary to well-designed talent programs that allow individuals to achieve mastery in fields of interest or appeal to their sense of purpose. Some talent development programs come with an application form, which is a great way of how we can treasure learning, and not mandate, it. The idea then, is for organizations to create a talent development ecosystem to appeal to learners and for all to be similarly motivated in their own development.

Here are a few best practices organizations can build into their learning programs to encourage self-driven learning:

  • Curated knowledge and programs available for learners to choose keeping in mind what is best for them
  • Learning tailored to individual differences and styles
  • Self-owned, intrinsic learning with some guidance on long-term learning journeys
  • Driving culture change to create an environment where individual experiences work as an opportunity for growth and an opportunity for self-discovery.
  • Teaching; learning, and helping individuals help one another develop. 
  • Learning leaders actively promote and facilitate networking and mentoring opportunities to grow interdependent relationships for improved outcomes and overall healthier organizations.

To create a culture of continuous learning, democratization and personalization of learning is a prerequisite. Learners should be encouraged to anticipate and not just react in determining the needs for new learning. The organization should encourage sharing of information and knowledge freely where every employee participates in collective learning activities. Learning should be integrated to the whole where the importance of learning is connected to the well being of self, others and all of life. They should promote a culture of curiosity and keep alive the power of wonder, welcome situations that raise uncomfortable questions and knowledge gaps. Learning organizations actively look for what needs to be ‘unlearned’ before new learning can take place. It is equally important that organizations create a psychologically safe environment where there is focus to learn from the fears, concerns and what is most meaningful to individuals. An environment of ‘abundance’ rather than one of deficit mindedness emphasizes learning that builds of strengths rather just fixing weaknesses.

Learning is a product whose demand is growing exponentially. L&D teams should act like Product Managers and start thinking about how to meet the growing consumer demand. Here is a checklist of some of the key considerations:

  • Product: Is the learning aligned to business needs, contextual and of high relevance to the employees?
  • People: What are the learning needs of employees and how do they learn?
  • Place: Where are the employees based and how can the organization efficiently provide them with knowledge? How accessible is learning? How can an organization set up a system for delivering learning that is agile and responds to changing needs but maintains quality?
  • Promotion: What is the brand of learning? How does the organization communicate the importance of learning to its employees?  
  • Price: What is the cost of creating, curating, transferring and applying knowledge?  
  • Performance: How does learning link to performance? 

How healthy is your learning ecosystem?

How healthy is your learning ecosystem?

Addressing your learning ecosystem as a ‘whole’

Organizations that have a compelling vision of employees skilled at “Creating”, “Acquiring”, “Transferring” and “Applying” knowledge are more agile and have the ability to respond faster to changing environments compared to their competitors. As a result, their employees continuously deliver higher performance. Learning fitness or learning health is an organization’s collective ‘abilities’ to perform. All too often, companies’ efforts to improve the learning ecosystem are concentrated in a single area – greater involvement of leadership, or more focus on mentoring. In the short term, gains are visible but soon disappear. Each of the building blocks of a learning organization is itself multidimensional and inter-connected.

Generative learning cannot be sustained in an organization where event thinking predominates. Organizations want learners to become fully immersed in learning, so that they can develop new strategies on how to solve problems or scenarios. This requires a conceptual framework of “structural” or systemic thinking, the ability to discover structural causes of behavior. Organizations aspire to improve their overall learning health knowing that it is next to impossible to build a culture of continuous learning, where employees exhibit life-long learner behaviors without having a fit and healthy learning ecosystem, but often forget that it takes a whole system’s approach.

The learning health of an organization comprises of several key building blocks:

  1. Strengthen the partnership – Align Learning with Strategy

Aligning learning strategy with business priorities is the starting point of leading successful learning function. As strategic business partners, organizations must ensure that their capability development initiatives support the mission of the businesses they work with. Key questions to address include – the extent to which the current and future needs of the business drive the learning strategy & plans in the organization, how learning & development budgets are being prepared and allocated and how agile the learning function is to change course and respond to new business requirements. To build alignment L&D teams must: 

  • Clearly articulate the few critical priorities and must-win battles to which the company and CEO are committed over the next three to five years.
  • Align current offerings (courses, content, target audiences, etc.) with the strategic priorities mentioned in the CEO agenda.
  • Get inputs and buy-in for the learning agenda from both the learning organization and leaders in the rest of the business — all the way to the CEO level.
  • Activate the learning agenda through programmatic activities and changes to the learning portfolio.
  • Ensure that the Budget allocation and planning mirrors long term and short term business priorities. Link all spend to performance metrics to ensure scrap learning is minimized and move to a near-zero learning inventory.
  • Set up governance councils to review the functioning of L&D periodically and improvise continuously to keep pace with the dynamic business environment. A mix of HR, Learning and Business Leaders in the governance councils can ensure balanced functioning.
  1. Impact Assessment – Play the role of a return creator

Resources are scarce, and ensuring the effectiveness of spend is critical. As Drucker said, “If you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it.” The one thing we cannot emphasize enough is creating accountability for the money we spend on learning. The L&D budget is at times referred to the “largest unmanaged investment in a company”. Often because of the wasteland of learning that is delivered but not applied on the job- “scrap learning”. Learning which is successfully developed but not applied on the job—comes with high costs. When learners can’t put what they’ve learned into practice, time and money are wasted. This hinders L&D’s ability to raise performance and contribute to impact. L&D’s responsibility is to not only impact change, but also make results measurable and visible. Often, they leave the value they create hidden, taking away from its importance. Most of the times there are simple ways to establish the return on investment. Key aspects to address include –learning metrics that should be used to measure efficiency and effectiveness of learning and the extent to which an organization uses data analytics, predictive modeling in taking decisions related to talent and learning.

This should, in essence, lead to commercial gains, productivity gains, and individual performance gains. At the end of the day, L&D’s goal is to tie learning to results. If organizations can figure out how to help people learn better, they can immediately solve all the other problems. If they get the objectives right, the design right and the delivery right, they will be able to get the effectiveness right.

  1. L&D Policies & Processes – Learning must be complemented by an aggregated input that spans across the complete employee life cycle

Learning processes involve the aggregation, creation, curation, collection, interpretation, and dissemination of knowledge. They include experimentation to develop and test new products and services; intelligence gathering to keep track of competitive, customer, and technological trends; disciplined analysis and interpretation to identify and solve problems; and education and training to develop employees. The underlying need to build core processes stems from the fact that effective learning cannot be the result of isolated capability development initiatives. All learning must be built around a consistent input of information across key employee “touch points” right from the start of the employee lifecycle to the end.  

Organizations need to integrate not just HR systems but also the structures, processes, governance models and strategies to succeed. Borrowing from the Gestalt school of thought “The whole is, after all, greater than the sum of its parts”

  1. L&D Portfolio – “Charter of Learning” that clearly outlines the L&D function’s reason for being- Raison d’être.  

L&D functions should continue to upgrade the nature and quality of services and solutions that they provide to meet the evolving and rapidly changing needs of the business. In many organizations, L&D is still tactical and operational while a few have raised their game where they continuously reconfigure the learning ecosystem architecture addressing both form and function, enable key performance outcomes through consulting, orchestrate and manage knowledge flows and exchange, drive change of learner behaviors and mindset, design learning experiences suited to the modern day learner, use instructional design to power specific learning outcomes, gather and mine business and employee data to improve the quality of decision making and curate content which is suited to the context of the organization.

  1. Tools and Technology: Connected of Things

We are currently witnessing a learning revolution of which technology is an integral part. Billions of dollars are being invested in new cloud-based Human Capital Management Systems. However, research shows that the HR technology environment is far more complex and chaotic than it was before. Though organizations are looking for a ‘single’ system of record for their employees, they are finding it difficult to find one system that addresses all of their requirements. Having said so, they are continuing to replace older heterogeneous systems including learning management systems that aren’t meeting business and learner needs and that are not integrated with other systems. Organizations require a set of software to deliver a single user interface; build and manage employee journeys, develop apps, create and monitor workflows and add forms of conversational interfaces to the mix to be able to meet business requirements and drive learner engagement. The introduction of Learning Experience Platforms (LXP) is helping them lead, enable, manage and support their L&D agenda and cater to the preferences and needs of the modern day ‘learner’. Such new-age technologies boost the learning health of the organization. Moreover, the ease of integrating such platforms & tools with enterprise-wide systems is ensuring that learning is at the heart and center of their businesses.

  1. Developing the Learning Professional: An evolving role

The role of L&D is that of a connector: connecting the learner to the learning, the learning to the business, the technology to design, and the context to the content.

L&D is a group of extraordinary potential: the potential to craft life-changing experiences, impact productivity and engagement and drive change. But to do this in today’s day and age, we need to go beyond the conventional and embrace the new.

L&D professionals today must have three emotions in their armor:

  • Business partners: A deep understanding of the business and strong stakeholder relationships are key. L&D professionals should treat business leaders as customers and must continuously challenge the business on needs and delivery methods and advise them on opportunities to impact business performance.
  • Empathy for the learner: Building shared empathy and understanding is a must-have skill for all L&D professionals today. In the times of experiential learning where we strive to craft life-changing experiences, learning design and delivery cannot be done unless L&D understands the “realities” of learners
  • Love for technology: For L&D to serve the modern learner, an appreciation of the role technology plays in the life of a learner is a must. In the age of modern learning, no learning intervention is complete without technology.
  1. The era of the Learner – Batch Size equals 1

Learner experience is much more than a buzzword; it heralds a paradigm shift. With learner experience, you are not creating a curriculum; you are creating an experience, one that will translate to the single most differentiating factor.

Over the last decade, the Internet, social media, and mobile access have become huge factors in our private and working lives, changing how we interact with information. By making personalized content available to learners anytime, anywhere and on multiple devices, L&D departments have a realistic shot at significantly reducing the learning curve.

  1. A lasting learning culture: Self Directed Learning

A philosophy where an individual feels responsible for their own development is essential to build an everyday learning culture, rather than an isolated training one. Learning initiatives must be intrinsically driven, for ensuring commitment over compliance. It’s just like therapy – you can’t really change unless you know there is a problem and want to.

Self-driven learning will come as a natural corollary to well-designed talent programs that allow individuals to achieve mastery in fields of interest or appeal to their sense of purpose.

As Dr. Kalam put it: “True learning is not a process of pouring in from without, but a calling forth what is within. It’s a process of nurturing, of allowing, of evoking. It is a process of bringing forth the person one is meant to be…”

In today’s workplace, where constant and rapid change is necessary to remain competitive, the best strategy is to create multi-faceted and flexible learning eco-systems, educate the learner on being a smart consumer, set and maintain context, and get out of the learner’s way.

Are you a learning organization?

Are you a learning organization?

Are you a learning organization?

Corporate mortality rates are on the rise. Is this only a symptom of a deeper problem that afflicts organizations causing some to perish and many to fail to live up to their potential? Are organizations institutionalizing mediocrity when excellence is a possibility? The concept of a learning organization isn’t new. In the 90’s, Peter Senge in his book, The Fifth Discipline, talked about learning disabilities of an organization and the impact it has. It is interesting that the words “whole” and “health” come from the same root (the Old English hal, as in “hale and hearty”). So it should come as no surprise that the unhealthiness of our learning today is in direct proportion to our inability to see it as a ‘whole’.    

A holistic approach to learning requires a supportive learning environment that emphasizes psychological safety, an appreciation of differences, openness to new ideas and time for reflection. It requires fit for purpose concrete learning processes and practices including experimentation, creating, acquiring, interpreting, transferring, retaining and applying knowledge and a leadership team that actively promotes and reinforces learning. 

Organizations need to learn more than ever before! Each organization must become a learning organization if it has to survive, sustain and grow. A learning organization has a compelling vision of employees skilled at “Creating”, “Acquiring”, “Transferring” and “Applying” knowledge. Such learning organizations are more agile and have the ability to respond faster to changing environments compared to their competitors. As a result, they continuously deliver higher performance. They are quick to modify their behavior to respond to those new knowledge & insights based on changing business conditions. Such organizations experiment to develop and test new products and services; gather intelligence to keep track of current and emerging business trends, have a disciplined approach to analyze, interpret and solve business problems using new knowledge and insights. They are always looking for more efficient and effective ways to improve the capacity and capabilities of their employees.

“The rate at which you and your employees learn may well become your only competitive sustainable advantage”

In today’s workplace, where constant and rapid change is necessary to remain competitive, the best strategy is to create multi-faceted and flexible learning eco-systems, educate the learner on being a smart consumer, set and maintain context, and get out of the learner’s way.

Learning fitness or learning health is your collective ‘abilities’ to perform. Organizations outperforming their competitors are seen to have a healthier learning ecosystem and are therefore:  

  • 11x more likely to improve the capability of the organization to solve problems
  • 3x more likely to achieve benefits related to growth in the competitive climate
  • 7x more likely to respond faster to changing business conditions
  • 3x more likely to achieve overall productivity benefits including improved talent strategies
  • 3x more likely to have improved sustainability and profitability including customer satisfaction

Early Warning Signs: Looking in the Mirror

It is not uncommon for an organization to exhibit early warning signs before deteriorating or dying. The key to optimal outcomes is recognition of these warning signs followed by an appropriate and timely response. Very often, the culmination of these signs shows up in lower engagement scores in which learning and development scores are unfavorable, ultimately leading to high attrition. Exit surveys consistently show that people leave organizations citing career advancement and development as a key reason. Research has evidenced that organizations that are recognized as ‘Best Employers’ offer differentiated career growth and learning opportunities to their employees. But yet again, many aren’t performing to their potential. 

Measuring and managing your organizational learning health is critical. Many organizations are unaware of what’s broken and missing. 

10 Signs you should watch out for:

  1. Managers play a passive-defensive role in encouraging their team members to be everyday learners or even more so discourage individuals and create barriers for them to be active learners. Such behaviors inhibit and impair learning, break employees’ spirit and demotivate them.
  2. Learning is primarily seen to be a compliance requirement and not driven by a culture of commitment, wherein the stick is only used to drive learner behaviors. Such an environment promotes behaviors where people act “out of fear” and not “out of performance”. 
  3. Learners are not recognized and rewarded for learning new skills and knowledge.
  4. Leaders and managers do not show interest to understand and appreciate the concerns, fears or what is most meaningful to an individual.
  5. Leaders and managers do not invest their time in nurturing and developing talent
  6. Leaders and managers do not encourage holistic learning based on the wealth of knowledge in the universe but limit learning to role requirements. 
  7. Organization operates with a deficit mindset and encourages learning only to fix weaknesses and not build on strengths. 
  8. Leaders and Subject Matter Experts in the organization do not invest their time in continuously upgrading their own knowledge and skills.
  9. Individuals are not rewarded for their team behaviors wherein they contribute to how the team learns together as a group and helps others grow and develop. 
  10. Leaders are not actively promoting the cause of learning and the learner. They are absent from most learning events themselves and do not role model the behaviors of an everyday learner – the desire to improve every day, be better, set higher standards for themselves. 

Each of the building blocks of a learning organization is itself multidimensional and inter-connected. Individual elements respond to different forces. You can enhance the learning health of an organization in various ways, depending on which subcomponent you emphasize.